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Fly – In Safaris

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Namibia is a vast country with a surface area of 824 268 km2, it is about four times the size of the United Kingdom and 27 times the size of Belgium. Blessed with bountiful sunshine, an abundance of wildlife and an intriguing variety of flora and fauna. Attributes that make it a country to which visitors return again and again are the friendliness and cultural diversity of its people, and above all, the pristine quality and extraordinary beauty of its landscape.

The country derives its name from the Namib Desert, a unique geological feature renowned for the unusual and haunting quality of its landscape. Far from being lifeless and barren, this narrow strip of moist coastal desert features an unusual variety of desert-adapted flora and fauna.

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What people are saying about Namibia

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The country can be divided into four distinct topographical regions. Of these the most definitive is possibly the Namib Desert, which consists of a 50 km – 140 km wide coastal plain extending along the entire coastline, interspersed with dune belts, dry riverbeds and deeply eroded canyons. The central plateau, which runs from north to south, has an average altitude of between 1,000 m and 2,000 m. This plateau gradually falls away towards the east, where a sandy strip of land merges into the level expanse of the Kalahari Desert. Dense, bush covered plains to the northeast of the Etosha Pan included the high-rainfall areas of Kavango and Caprivi, typified by woodland savannah and riverine vegetation.

With a dry climate, typical of a semi-desert country, droughts are a regular occurrence. Average day temperatures in the summer vary from 20◦C – 34◦C and average night temperatures in the winter from 0◦C – 10◦C. The Benguela Current is also the prime determinant of the climate of the Namib, as it reduces rainfall and causes the omnipresent fog typical of the coast.

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Namibia Map

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Experience Namibia’s diverse geography amid some of Africa’s best wildlife viewing. Fly between our secluded luxury camps to maximize time for safaris and exploration. Learn about cheetah and leopard conservation and see them up close at the AfriCat Foundation.

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Safari highlights

(Click On Links To View Additional Info.)
Namin Naukluft Park
Sossusvlei
Skeleton Coast
North-western Namibia
Etosha National Park
Africat Foundation

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Day 1:
Hosea Kutako International Airport – Windhoek

A representative from SafariWise will meet you at Hosea Kutako Airport. We transfer to our overnight accommodation at Olive Grove Guest House.

The Olive Grove is a stylish guesthouse in Windhoek’s Eros suburb. Taking its name from the neighbouring grove of olive trees, the guesthouse is located in a renovated old house. It has been open since early 2004 when it quickly grew in popularity as a favourite place to stay in Namibia’s capital city. The contemporary design and décor of the guesthouse has been well thought through. Lanterns and fabrics that mix Moroccan and Indonesian themes soften the minimalist style.
Accommodation: Olive Grove Guesthouse
Meals: Dinner

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Day 2:
Windhoek – Sossusvlei

After breakfast, we transfer to Eros Airport where we meet our pilot to fly to Sossusvlei.

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Namibia Wildlife Resorts launched the first lodge in the Namib-Naukluft Park, the Sossus Dune Lodge, in June 2007. Built in an environmentally sensitive manner, primarily from wood, canvas and thatch, in an attractive ‘afro-village’ style, Sossus Dune Lodge offers guests an evocative and life changing experience. Situated within the park, guests benefit from being able to reach Sossusvlei before sunrise, and stay until after sunset, and on their return after an exhilarating day, relax in the tranquility and splendor of the Namib Desert, under the spectacular African sky.
Accommodation: Sossus Dune Lodge
Meals: Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

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Day 3:
Sossus Dune Camp

A very early start before sunrise. We drive to Sossusvlei in time to see the beautiful Namib sunrise.

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The Sossusvlei, Namibia’s famous highlight in the heart of the Namib Desert, is a huge clay pan, enclosed by giant sand dunes. Some of the spectacular hills of sand are, at a height of 300 metres, the highest in the world. Only after a heavy rainfall, which is a rare event in this area, does the “vlei” fill with water. As the clay layers hardly allow any water infiltration, a turquoise lake will remain for quite some time.

After lunch, we visit the Sesriem Canyon, one of the amazing features of the Namib. Here the Tsauchab River has carved a gorge – up to 30 meters deep and about 1 km long – into the conglomerate gravels deposited some 15 – 18 million years ago during a wetter phase in the history of the Namib. From the parking area, a track leads to the canyon floor and a walk into Sesriem is like descending through the layers of time.
Accommodation: Sossus Dune Lodge
Meals: Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

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Day 4:
Sossus Dune Lodge

Explore the area with our guide.
Accommodation: Sossusvlei Dune Lodge
Meals: Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

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Day 5:
Sossus Dune Lodge – Sesriem landing strip – Swakopmund

Today you fly from Little Kulala Lodge into the Diamond Restricted Area, over the remains of three old diamond camps and crossing the coastline at Conception Bay, passing colonies of Cape Fur seals, the shipwreck of the passenger liner “Eduard Bohlen” stranded in 1909, she lies 250m away from the shore. Further along the coast another shipwreck, the “Shaunee” stranded in 1976. Along the coast with the Atlantic surf on the one side and the “long wall” (Namib Dunes) on the other, we reach Sandwich Harbour, a wetland of international importance and protected by the Ramsar Convention. The highest recorded density of Lesser and Greater flamingo’s was recorded at low tide with 7 791 birds/km. In harmony with the surroundings, we find Namibia’s coastal salt mines, south of Walvis Bay, attracting thousands of birds. Walvis Bay, Namibia’s major harbour town and a former enclave to South Africa, which was incorporated into Namibia on 1 March 1994, is our next destination. Midway between Walvis Bay and Swakopmund, we pass the Langstrand Holiday Resort and the Dolphin Park Recreation Resort on your way to Swakopmund.

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Swakopmund is situated on the coast and surrounded by desert. It offers a wide variety of attractions in an atmosphere unique in its appeal. The influence of German architecture, dating back to the turn of the last century, can be seen.

The four star Hansa Hotel is situated in the centre of Swakopmund and offers easy access to everything Swakopmund has to offer. The Hansa Hotel offers well decorated and comfortable rooms, each with its own individual touch. The restaurant is amongst the most popular in Swakopmund; the residents bar features a large fireplace, which offers welcome relief from the cool Swakop night temperatures. The Hansa Hotel also has a secluded garden courtyard, which is well protected from the Swakopmund weather.

Extra optional activities: Quadbiking, sand boarding, Boat fishing, Ballooning, & Scenic flights over the Skeleton Coast.
Accommodation: Hansa Hotel

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Meals: Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

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Day 6:
Swakopmund area

Today we join Levo Tours on a Dolphin Cruise.

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The ski boats depart from the Tanker Jetty at the Walvis Bay Harbour. We go along the coast to the Bird Island and foreign boats, and then cross to Pelican Point. Friendly seals come join us on the boat to be fed, while dolphins swim around enjoying the fun. Fresh oysters, snacks, champagne, beer and soft drinks are served at the seal colony before we return to Walvis Bay via the Lagoon.

The Walvis Bay lagoon takes pride of place as regards scenic attractions in the area. A tranquil stretch of water, its natural beauty is accentuated by thousand of flamingos, which gather at these rich feeding grounds. Altogether, some 80,000 wading birds can be seen on the lagoon.
Accommodation: Hansa Hotel
Meals: Breakfast / light lunch on the boat / Dinner

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Day 7:
Hansa Hotel

The Living Desert Tour, originally developed by Tommy himself, is a unique 4×4-adventure drive through the dunes outside Swakopmund, Namibia. Just the drive in the dunes is an amazing experience, but Tommy will show us a lot more than sand. The tour takes us from the vegetated, life-rich eastern side of the dunes, right through the dunes to the Atlantic Ocean on the western side of the dune belt. Tommy introduces us to some of the fascinating, hidden life in this apparently barren landscape that is part of the Namib Desert. Here we can find creatures endemic to the Namib: the sidewinder (Peringuey’s Adder), the Palmato Gecko with its transparent skin and beautiful colours – we dig into the dune side to find this nocturnal desert-dweller. We track the large Namaqua Chameleon, and watch it enjoy brunch.

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Then it’s a dash to catch the swift sand-diving lizard. We find out how the area’s plants and small animals survive the harsh climate, and how they obtain water for life. We will also track a FitzSimon’s Burrowing Skink across the dune face, in hopes of catching this legless lizard. Along the way, Tommy will explain the variety of dune colours. At the end of the tour, weather permitting, we will experience a ‘roaring’ dune.

Other characters to be found in the dune belt are the ‘dancing’ White Lady Spider; the Parabuthus Villosus black scorpion; the occasional horned adder or sand-snake; desert wasps, fish-moths, crickets and several beetle species, and many more. A Living Desert Tour with the enthusiastic Tommy is educational, fun and an unforgettable experience. We will see the desert and dunes with new eyes. The photographic opportunities are endless too: make sure those batteries are charged before we leave!

This half-day tour leaves at 8am in the morning, and returns at approximately 1pm.
Accommodation: Hansa Hotel
Meals: Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

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Day 8:
Swakopmund – Swakopmund Airport – Epupa Falls

After breakfast, we transfer to Swakopmund Airport.

The early morning low-level scenic flight departs from Swakopmund airfield, past the Brandberg, over Damaraland and Kaokoland to Epupa Falls.

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In Epupa accompanied by a guide and translater, we will be driven to an Ovahimba village in the area and spend the morning with the Ovahimbas in their ‘kraal’. The Ovahimba are a tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who still live and dress according to ancient traditions. They are tall, slender and statuesque people, characterized by their proud yet friendly bearing. The women are noted for their unusual sculptural beauty, enhanced by intricate hairstyles and traditional adornments. The Ovahimba rub their bodies with red ochre and fat to protect their skin against the scorching sun. However, on this day we will also be able to see the magestic Epupa Falls.

Just a few minute’s walk downstream from Epupa Falls Lodge — but out of earshot — we will find the Epupa Falls, a series of cascades that drop a total of 60 m over a distance of about 1.5 km, reaching a maximum width of 500 m. Originating from the Herero word for the spume created by falling water, Epupa is a fitting name for this fascinating sight. To quote the Bradt Travel Guide, “Epupa Falls don’t compare to Victoria Falls in scale, they are all the more beautiful for occurring in such an arid region.” Nowhere else in the world will we find a waterfall contrasted with such wild, arid desert landscape. Watching the Epupa Falls and its white mists of water against the red colours of the surrounding desert and mountains during sunset, with a sundowner drink in one hand and our camera or binoculars in the other, is likely to make up one the most beautiful and memorable experiences during our trip to Namibia. However, Epupa Falls is not just a great place to see and photograph. It is also a great place to go for a dip in one of the hundreds of natural pools gradually carved out of the rocks over millennia by the torrents of the falling water.

Epupa Falls Lodge consists of nine luxury safari-style tents erected on stone platforms, each with two single beds and en-suite bathroom. All tents have electricity and mosquito netting and an outside, shaded balcony overlooking the tranquil Kunene River. Large makalani palms overhead provide welcome shade from the midday sun.

The adjacent dining room and lounge area also face the Kunene River, along with a lounging pool for cooling down from the midday heat, or enjoying a glass of sparkling wine while watching the sunset.

A small suspension bridge connects Epupa Falls Lodge with its own private island with hammocks, benches, and lounge chairs along the river to create your own little piece of paradise.

Epupa Falls Lodge works closely with the local community to provide them with access to development opportunities and direct benefits through tourism. Epupa Falls Lodge has a sound ecological policy that includes removing all solid waste from the area and, whenever practical, recycling waste.

Activities include a visit to a Himba settlement, Sundowner, Visit to Epupa Falls & a birdwatching excursion by boat.
Accommodation: Epupa Falls Lodge
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Meals: Full board

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Day 9:
Epupa Falls Lodge

Take part in the activities at the Lodge.
Accommodation: Epupa Falls Lodge
Meals: Full board

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Day 10:
Epupa Falls Lodge

Take part in the activities at the Lodge.
Accommodation: Epupa Falls Lodge
Meals: Full board

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Day 11:
Epupa Falls Lodge – Mokuti Landing strip – Onkoshi Camp

After breakfast we transfer to Mokuti landing strip, east of Etosha National Park.

When it was originally proclaimed at the turn of the century the Etosha Park consisted of an area of 100,000 square kilometers. This was the largest reserve on earth but in the 1960’s political pressure resulted in the Park being reduced to its current size Etosha, meaning “Great White Place”, is dominated by a massive mineral pan. The pan is part of the Kalahari Basin, the floor of which was formed around 1000 million years ago. The Etosha Pan covers around 25% of the National Park. The pan was originally a lake fed by the Kunene River. However, the course of the river changed thousands of years ago and the lake dried up. The pan now is a large dusty depression of salt and dusty clay, which fills only if the rains are heavy and even then only holds water for a short time. This temporary water in the Etosha Pan attracts thousands of wading birds including impressive flocks of flamingos. The perennial springs along the edges of the Etosha Pan draw large concentrations of wildlife and birds.

Onkoshi Camp is the latest addition to Namibia Wildlife Resorts portfolio. Nestled on the rim of the pan on a secluded peninsula, Onkoshi Camp is a low impact, environmentally friendly establishment with only 15 units (30 beds), which guarantees a truly personal and exclusive experience. The location is entirely out of view of current tourist routes, and all other developments in the area, and thus offers a pristine, tranquil and unique experience. Guests arrive in Namutoni from where they are transported to Onkoshi Camp in NWR vehicles.

Onkoshi Camp offers superb vistas over the Etosha pan, with its shimmering mirages during the hot days; dramatic sunset and sunrise textures and colours; sense of isolation and space; clear night skies; and the sights, smells and sounds of untamed and unadulterated Africa.

All rooms are built on elevated wooden decks, with thatched roofs, canvas walls and large, wooden-framed retractable doors allowing spectacular panoramic views. Rooms are tastefully equipped with locally crafted fittings and furnishings, using a blend of metal and wood combined with natural fabrics to create a natural and ethnic ambiance.
Accommodation: Onkoshi Camp

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Meals: Full board

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Day 12:
Etosha National Park

Game drives in Etosha.
Accommodation: Onkoshi Camp
Meals: Full board

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Day 13:
Etosha National Park

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.Game drives in Etosha.
Accommodation: Onkoshi Camp
Meal arrangements: Full board

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Day 14:
Etosha National Park

Game drives in Etosha.
Accommodation: Onkoshi Camp
Meals: Full board

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Day 15
Etosha National park – Okonjima Bush Camp

After breakfast, we depart to Okonjima Bush Camp.

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West of the Waterberg Plateau the vast plains are occasionally broken by the remnants of the Etjo sandstone, which once covered large areas of northern Namibia. Nestled amongst one of these relics – the Omboroko Mountains – lays Okonjima, a Herero name meaning “place of the baboons”. Okonjima is a family run guest lodge and the home of the Africat Foundation. We will be able to see leopard and cheetah during their feeding times and join highly informative Bushmen and Bantu trails. At Okonjima, we will see the Africat Foundation at work, learn more about leopard and cheetah, and have excellent photographic opportunities.
Accommodation: Okonjima Bush Camp
Meals: Full board

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Day 16
Okonjima Bush Camp

Today we are taking part in the amazing activities that Okonjima offers on the farm. Activities on the farm include Cheetah tracking on foot, the Cheetah Project, Leopard tracking, Birding, Photography and the Bushman Trail.
Accommodation: Okonjima Bush Camp
Meals: Full board

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Day 17:
Okonjima Bush Camp – Windhoek

We transfer you to the airport for your flight back home. We visit the Okahandja craft market on our way to Windhoek. Safari ends.
Meals: Breakfast

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Tour cost

Quoted price: *on request*
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Included in the quoted price:

  • En-Suite Accommodation: as stipulated in the itinerary
  • Meals: As stipulated in the itinerary
  • Professional Namibian Guide
  • Vehicle
  • Fuel
  • All Road Taxes
  • All excursions/activities as per itinerary
  • All entrance fees
  • Limited soft drinks in the vehicle

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Excluded from quoted price:

  • Return Flight costs
  • Beverages
  • Gratuities
  • Optional activities
  • Travel insurance
  • Laundry
  • Items of a personal nature

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Notes:
a) Please note that the accommodation outlined in the itinerary may, very occasionally, need to be amended. Replacements lodges and hotels will always be of the same standard as the ones outlined in the itinerary and will in no way affect your holiday. Should we have to implement any changes to the above we will notify you as soon as possible.
b) A 15% non-refundable deposit is required on confirmation of safari. Full payment is required sixty (60) days prior to arrival.
c) Quoted price is subject to availability and fuel/gas price- and exchange rate fluctuations.
d) Terms & Conditions.

2 Responses to “Fly – In Safaris”

  1. Jim Russell said:

    I would like a quote for 2 people sharing for June 2011. I was given your details by Jill Damment

  2. Bruno Gila said:

    Pls give me an idea on cost to do a round flight over the Skeleton Coast departing from Swakop or Walvis for 8 clients.Can be a few hours or a circular , scenic flight to see the desert dunes , coast with shipwrecks and perhaps some game.
    Date is for the 3 or 4 March 2013.
    Fondest regards to Neil
    Bruno

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