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Namibia self-drive with a touch of Botswana

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Introduction To Namibia

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Namibia is a vast country with a surface area of 824 268 km2, it is about four times the size of the United Kingdom and 27 times the size of Belgium. Blessed with bountiful sunshine, an abundance of wildlife and an intriguing variety of flora and fauna. Attributes that make it a country to which visitors return again and again are the friendliness and cultural diversity of its people, and above all, the pristine quality and extraordinary beauty of its landscape.

The country derives its name from the Namib Desert, a unique geological feature renowned for the unusual and haunting quality of its landscape. Far from being lifeless and barren, this narrow strip of moist coastal desert features an unusual variety of desert-adapted flora and fauna.

The country can be divided into four distinct topographical regions. Of these the most definitive is possibly the Namib Desert, which consists of a 50 km – 140 km wide coastal plain extending along the entire coastline, interspersed with dune belts, dry riverbeds and deeply eroded canyons. The central plateau, which runs from north to south, has an average altitude of between 1,000 m and 2,000 m. This plateau gradually falls away towards the east, where a sandy strip of land merges into the level expanse of the Kalahari Desert. Dense, bush covered plains to the north-east of the Etosha Pan included the high-rainfall areas of Kavango and Caprivi, typified by woodland savannah and riverine vegetation.

With a dry climate, typical of a semi-desert country, droughts are a regular occurrence. Average day temperatures in the summer vary from 20◦C – 34◦C and average night temperatures in the winter from 0◦C – 10◦C. The Benguela Current is also the prime determinant of the climate of the Namib, as it reduces rainfall and causes the omnipresent fog typical of the coast.

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Introduction To Botswana

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Botswana is one of the few remaining destinations in Africa that still provides a good sense of adventure while on safari. Its expansive game parks and preserves, while offering wildlife as diverse and abundant as that found anywhere else, are still largely undeveloped and untamed.

Botswana lies immediately to the north of South Africa. It is bordered on the north and west by Namibia, on the north and east by Zimbabwe, and is connected by a narrow strip of land on the northern border to Zambia. Its territory consists almost entirely of a broad, flat, arid subtropical plateau, though there are hills in the eastern part of the country.

In the northwest, the Okavango River empties into the Kalahari sands, creating the largest inland river delta in the world. While the Okavango Delta is home to relatively few large game animals in comparison to other areas of Botswana, its clear waters and myriad small islands are home to an astounding variety of birds, plants, and smaller species of animals.

Nearby is Chobe National Park, a beautiful grassland reserve that has gained international fame for its abundant elephant population. Southeast of Chobe are Botswana’s enormous Makgadikgadi salt pans, home to large herds of blue wildebeest, several antelope species, and those international lovers of salt pans, flamingos.
Almost the entire remaining portion of the country is covered by the Kalahari Desert – a varied environment of sand, savanna, and grassland. Although this area of Botswana is only sparsely inhabited by humans, it is one of the richest wildlife regions in all of Africa.
Botswana’s two largest parks, the Central Kalahari Game reserve and Gemsbok National Park, are found in this region.

botswana_workshop02Botswana’s climate can get rather cool, particularly during the dry winter months of June-August when night occasionally brings frost. The rainy summer months (December through March) are best avoided for those interested in enjoying the best game viewing conditions. The aboriginal inhabitants of Botswana, who have made the Kalahari their home for at least 30,000 years, are the San, or bushmen. The San number about 60,000 today, constituting a small but fascinating cultural minority in the country. Almost two millennia ago, a Bantu people known as the Tswana arrived, supplanting the San and now constituting the great majority of the population.
The discovery of gold in Botswana in the late 19th century attracted the interest of the Boers, leading the fiercely independent but desperate Tswana nations to petition the British for protection.
Botswana was granted protectorate status (as Bechuanaland) in 1885, though local authority was maintained with determination by the Tswana chiefs. In 1966, in the same wave of change that brought independence to much of the continent, Bechuanaland became the independent Republic of Botswana.
The very next year, the discovery of enormous diamond reserves in Botswana transformed the poor country’s economic prospects. Today it enjoys one of the highest economic growth rates of any country in the world, although its national wealth has not solved the problem of widespread unemployment.

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This 22-day self-drive safari is ideal for the curios traveler with time on hand.  You explore a huge variety of unique areas.  Not to even mention the 5 days of luxury camping in Botswana. This is a safari not to be missed with the ultimate African experience.

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Safari highlights

(Click On Links To View Additional Info.)
Africat Foundation
Etosha National Park
Okavango River
Moremi Game Reserve
Savuti Game Reserve

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TOUR PROGRAMME

Day 1: Hosea Kutako International Airport – Windhoek

A representative from your vehicle rental company meets you at Hosea Kutako International Airport. You will be transferred to Windhoek where you will receive your self-drive vehicle and sign the necessary documentation.The four star Safari Court Hotel is situated on 13 hectares on the outskirts of Windhoek. The hotel offers the largest local selection of first class accommodation and catering with a difference.
Accommodation: Safari Court Hotel

Meals: Dinner for own account

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Day 2: Okonjima Lodge
After breakfast you depart to Okonjima Lodge. West of the Waterberg Plateau the vast plains are occasionally broken by the remnants of the Etjo sandstone, which once covered large areas of northern Namibia. Nestled amongst one of these relics – the Omboroko Mountains – lies Okonjima, a Herero name meaning “place of the baboons”. Okonjima is a family run guest lodge and the home of the Africat Foundation. You will be able to see leopard and cheetah during their feeding times and join highly informative Bushmen and Bantu trails. At Okonjima you will see the Africat Foundation at work, learn more about leopard and cheetah, and have excellent photographic opportunities.
Accommodation: Okonjima Bush Camp

Meals: Full board

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Day 3: Okonjima Lodge
Activities at the lodge.
Accommodation: Okonjima Bush camp
Meals: Full board

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Day 4: Okonjima – Etosha National Park
After breakfast you depart to Etosha National Park.
You arrive at the enormous 22,000sq km Etosha National Park in the late afternoon. Herds of Burchell’s zebra, springbok and numerous other antelope species provide continual hunting opportunities for the lion prides. Etosha is famous for its elephants and also boasts healthy populations of black rhino, Damara dik-dik and black-faced impala.

Strategically located halfway between Okaukuejo and Namutoni, Halali is situated at the base of a dolomite hill, amongst shady Mopane trees, and provides an ambiance of tranquillity and space. It is surrounded by some popular waterholes in the park. A flood – lit waterhole which is viewed from an elevated vantage point within the camp provides exceptional wildlife viewing throughout the day and into the night.
Accommodation: Halali Resort

Meals: Breakfast

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Day 5: Etosha National Park
Activities – game drives.
Accommodation: Halali Resort
Meals: Breakfast

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Day 6: Etosha National Park
On the eastern side of Etosha Park, Namutoni centres around a beautiful old German Fort, overlooking the flood-lit King Nehale waterhole. The fort dates back to German police post built before the turn of the 20th century, which was later used as an army base. The fort has now been developed into the hub of activity, offering tow restaurant, private chill lounge, a bar crafts boutique, curio shop, jewelry an d bookstore. The Fort area is for pedestrian access only, and an elevated decked walkway along the water-hole facing wall provides opportunities for enjoying the surrounding scenery, wildlife and the spectacular sunsets over the flood-lit waterhole.
Accommodation: Namutoni Resort

Meals: Breakfast

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Day 7: Etosha National Park
Activities – game drives.
Accommodation: Namutoni Resort
Meals: Breakfast

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Day 8: Etosha National Park – Roy’s Camp
Roy’s Camp offers accommodation in rustic style bungalows east of Grootfontein. It is a convenient place to stop between Windhoek , or central Namibia, and Rundu and the Caprivi. The individual bungalows each have its own character and is placed in such a way that you experience maximum nature while here.

Each bungalow at Roy’s has en-suite facilities, and a private braai area, built to allow each guest some peace and tranquillity. The curio shop specialises in locally made artefacts. Whether you decide to stay in a bungalow or camp, you will receive a warm welcome at Roy’s.
Accommodation: Roy’s Camp

Meals: Breakfast/ Dinner

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Day 9: Roy’s Camp – Nunda River Lodge
After breakfast you depart to Nunda River Lodge.
This newly established lodge is situated on the Kavango River between Popa Falls and Ngepi Camp, near Divundu. Nunda River Lodge is in close proximity to two game parks, Mahango and the newly proclaimed Bwabwata, previously the Caprivi Game Park and Buffalo Park.
Accommodation: Nunda River Lodge

Meals: Breakfast / Dinner

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Day 10: Nunda River Lodge
Explore the area into the different parks. Nunda also offers extra optional activities.
Accommodation: Nunda River Lodge
Meals: Breakfast / Dinner

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Day 11: Nunda River Lodge – Drotsky’s Cabins
You leave Namibia and enter Botswana at Shakawe. The narrow Okavango panhandle extends for 100 kilometers from the Namibian border south. It is the result of a 15-kilometer wide geological fault, which constricts the meandering river until it is released into the main delta. Drotsky’s Cabins, a lovely and welcoming camp lies beside a channel of the Okavango River. It is set amid a thick riverine forest with fabulous bird watching and fine views across the reeds and papyrus.
Accommodation: Drotsky’s Cabins

Meals: Breakfast / Dinner

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Day 12: Drotsky’s Cabins
Take part in extra optional activities.
Accommodation: Drotsky’s Cabins
Meals: Breakfast / Dinner

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Day 13: Drotsky’s Cabins – Maun Lodge
Maun Lodge is situated along the banks of the Thamalakane River in Maun, the gateway to the Okavango Delta.

Maun Lodge offers you luxury accommodation, banqueting and conference facilities and personal service at affordable prices. Located only 2,5km’s from the town centre and just 4km’s from the International Airport, Maun Lodge is the ideal location for international visitors and business travellers.

Optional activities at an extra cost include: A helicopter or light aircraft flight over the Okavango Delta, Cultural Village Tour, visit to Okavango Ceramics or a visit to the Crocodile Farm.
Accommodation: Maun Lodge

Meals: Breakfast /Dinner

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Day 14: Maun Lodge – Moremi Game Reserve
This morning after breakfast, you depart Maun for your next destination – the Moremi Game Reserve, situated in the eastern part of the Okavango Delta.

This game reserve has no fences, therefore allowing unobstructed seasonal movement of game making this a largely natural area. This is a paradise for birds, game and predators alike.

Moremi’s scenery alone is enough reason to want to visit this park. Completely varied vegetation is what makes this area so special. Within one hour of traveling it is possible to view the first of the wildlife inhabiting this area. You spend 2 nights camping in the Xaxanaka area. Your days consist of early morning and late afternoon game drives, with a rest period in the camp in the heat of the day. You explore this side of Moremi in detail, with unforgettable experiences.
Accommodation: Camping – Xaxanaka area

Meals: Full board

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Day 15: Moremi Game Reserve
Game drives in the park.
Accommodation: Camping – Xacanaka area
Meals: Full board

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Day 16: Moremi Game Reserve
Game drives in the park.
Accommodation: Camping – Xacanaka area
Meals: Full board

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Day 17: Moremi Game Reserve – Savuti
Departing Moremi Game Reserve, for your next destination – Savuti, one of Africa’s most densely populated predator areas and is also well known for its sightings of bull elephants. The Savuti waterhole offers an ever-changing spectacle of birds and wildlife. Morning and afternoon game drives with leisure time to relax during the heat of the day.
Accommodation: Camping – Savuti

Meals: Full board

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Day 18: Savuti Game drives in the park.
Accommodation: Camping – Savuti
Meals: Full board

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Day 19: Savuti – Maun Lodge
You are transferred back to Maun Lodge where you overnight before driving back to Namibia.
Accommodation: Maun Lodge

Meals: Breakfast

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Day 20: Maun – Gobabis
A very early start to drive to Gobabis area. You overnight at Kalahari Bush Tracks.

The Kalahari Desert is a vast sandveld region which extends over central and western Botswana into eastern Namibia and the Northern Cape. Although generally described as a desert, the typical Kalahari landscape is surprisingly well-vegetated.

The garden is shaded by worm-barkfalse-thorn trees (Albizia Anthelmintica) and overlooks a floodlit waterhole where game and birds flock during the day. Natural building materials were used. The colours and patterns have an African feel and traditional Namibian cosiness. You are looked after by a husband and wife team assisted by well trained, friendly staff conversant in various European and African languages.

The three-levelled thatched complex and 2 Chalets can accommodate up to sixteen people (plus 2 guides) sharing. There are eight bedrooms, two which are equipped with double beds, and all have en-suite bathrooms.

The partly covered lapa can be referred to as the ‘heart’ of the guest house with open fireplace, a kitchen and bar facilities.
Accommodation: Kalahari Bush Tracks
Meals: Breakfast

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Day 21: Gobabis area – Windhoek
After breakfast you depart to Windhoek where you overnight at the Safari Court Hotel.
Accommodation: Safari Court Hotel

Meals: Breakfast

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Day 22: Windhoek – Hosea Kutako International Airport
You return your vehicle to the rental company from where they transfer you to the airport.

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Quoted price: *on request*

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Included in the quoted price:

  • En-Suite Accommodation and camping facilities: as stipulated in the itinerary
  • Meals: As stipulated in the itinerary
  • Vehicle
  • Activities at Okonjima & Okavango camping
  • Entrance fees in Botswana while on camping excursion

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Excluded from quoted price:

  • Return Flight costs
  • Road taxes in Botswana
  • Additional Entrance fees
  • Beverages
  • Gratuities
  • Optional activities
  • Travel insurance
  • Laundry

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Notes:
a) The costing for the Tour Programme is based on a minimum of two (2) guests.
b) Please also note that the accommodation outlined in the itinerary may, very occasionally, need to be amended. Replacements lodges and hotels will always be of the same standard as the ones outlined in the itinerary and will in no way affect your holiday. Should we have to implement any changes to the above we will notify you as soon as possible.
c) A 15% non-refundable deposit is required on confirmation of safari.
d) Full payment is required sixty (60) days prior to arrival.
e) Quoted price is subject to availability and fuel/gas price- and exchange rate fluctuations.
f) Terms & Conditions.

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One Response to “Namibia self-drive with a touch of Botswana”

  1. José Daniel Jiménez Segura said:

    Hello
We are four people who are thinking of going on holidays to Namibia And Botswana.
    We have four weeks to spare, from 30th august to 28thSeptember. We flight to Johannesburg and we depart from the same place.
 We want to rent a car And drive it ourselves, if possible.
 We prefer to sleep in a tent we carry, inside the national parks in both countries.
We want to do an itinerary starting from johanessbourg, up Namibia through the dessert of namib, to victoria falls And then down through Botswana arriving again to johanessbourg..
 We want you to organize an itinerary, advice us about the car And how to rent ir, tell us about the reservations to get inside the national parks, to visit them And sleep inside. Also about the visit to victoria falls and okavango delta, how to get there, how to visit, etc
 We would like to have a nice price, also!!!
Thanks in advice, And tell us about any other thing you think is important.
Best regards